One out of every nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society.1 It is the second-leading cause of cancer death in American men, just behind lung cancer, and it’s estimated that one out of every 41 men will die from prostate cancer.2

One out of every nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society.1 It is the second-leading cause of cancer death in American men, just behind lung cancer, and it’s estimated that one out of every 41 men will die from prostate cancer.2

Prostate cancer may run in some families, suggesting a genetic component to the disease. If you have a father or brother with this type of cancer, it more than doubles your risk for getting the disease, according to the American Cancer Society3. The risk is also much higher for men who have several relatives with prostate cancer, especially if the disease occurred when the person was young4.

Inherited genetic mutations may also increase the risk for developing this disease, but this type of risk only accounts for a small percentage of the overall cases. Aggressive cancer can be caused by certain mutated genes, but most of the commonly known genes like BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for less than 5% of all cases. Other genetic changes called single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can help define risk for the other 95% of cases.

For example:

  • Mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes raise the risk for breast and ovarian cancers in some families, according to the American Cancer Society. Mutations in these genes, and especially with the BRCA2 gene, may also increase the risk for prostate cancer in men.5
  • Men affected by Lynch syndrome, a condition caused by inherited gene changes that is also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, may have a higher risk for several cancers, including prostate cancer.6

Still, the vast majority of prostate cancers occur in men who do not have a family history nor a mutation.

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1. “Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer: Prostate Cancer Facts.” American Cancer Society, www.cancer.org/cancer/prostate-cancer/about/key-statistics.html.
2. “Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer: Prostate Cancer Facts.” American Cancer Society, www.cancer.org/cancer/prostate-cancer/about/key-statistics.html.
3. “Prostate Cancer Risk Factors.” American Cancer Society, www.cancer.org/cancer/prostate-cancer/causes-risks-prevention/risk-factors.html.
4. Gann, Peter H. “Risk factors for prostate cancer.” Reviews in urology vol. 4 Suppl 5,Suppl 5 (2002): S3-S10.
5. “What Causes Prostate Cancer?” American Cancer Society, www.cancer.org/cancer/prostate-cancer/causes-risks-prevention/what-causes.html.
6. “Lynch Syndrome.” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 17 May 2018, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lynch-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20374714.

Our genetic test encourages men to be actively involved in the development of their personalized prostate cancer screening approach at an early stage. With a simple cheek swab, Prompt Prostate Genetic Score(PGS) compares your specific genetic profile to tens of thousands of others and can help you and your healthcare practitioner determine what is best for you.

Prompt PGS will empower you and your healthcare practitioner with your genetic score to make an informed decision about screening.

Knowledge is power… Ask your healthcare practitioner about your Prompt Prostate Genetic Score today.

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